Porn Star Cut Loose for Sexually Assaulting Co-Workers

James_Deen_2010

James Deen in 2010

Actors are encouraged to be ‘motivated’ by something — something they’ve experienced, something they’ve imagined experiencing, a style of acting . . . something.

That said, one has to really wonder what ‘motivated’ a male porn star to sexually assault at least two of his female porn-performing colleagues. If he did so, as they allege.

Well, the porn industry apparently believes the two women: The industry has severed ties with the man who calls himself James Deen. And probably not a moment too soon.

He apparently had a not-so-hot reputation even before these charges were leveled against him. Let’s say that another way: He’s been publically accused of sexual assault by the two actresses, but neither had, as of Monday, reported the incidents to the police.

Why? Because, as one of them said in an essay, “people—including the police—tend to believe that sex workers have placed themselves in harm’s way, and therefore can’t be assaulted. Of course, this claim couldn’t be further from the truth, as being involved in sex work does not equate to being harmed.

“Despite porn being a legal form of sex work, and it occurring in a controlled environment such as a porn set, this blame-the-victim mentality is still inherent in much of society. In turn, sex workers are silenced and our negative experiences are swept under the rug as we try to protect ourselves from the judgment of others—or worse, a variety of problems ranging from further physical attacks to professional issues such as slander and/or blacklisting.

“Simply put: I was afraid,” Tori Lux said.

The 29-year old’s essay, published by The Daily Beast, describes an incident in 2011, which began after she’d finished a scene at “a major porn studio.”

While James wasn’t performing with me that day, he was present on set—and almost immediately after I’d finished my scene he began to antagonize me. I hadn’t even had time to dress myself when he said, with a smirk on his face, “Tori Lux, would you like to sniff my testicles?” “Nope,” I replied in a neutral tone. “I’ll repeat myself: Tori Lux, would you like to sniff my testicles?” he asked, more aggressively this time. I replied with a firm “No,” in order to establish my boundary—which James then disregarded by grabbing me by the throat and shoving me down onto a mattress on the floor.

He proceeded to straddle my chest, pinning down my arms with his knees. Then, he raised his hand high above his head, swinging it down and hitting me in the face and head with an open palm. He did this five or six times—hard—before finally getting off of me.

Disoriented and nursing a sore jaw, I stood up—but before I could collect myself, he grabbed me by my hair and shoved me to my knees, forcing my face into his crotch several times before shoving me to the floor. I was completely stunned, having no idea how to react. I felt pressured to maintain a professional demeanor as this was a major porn set, with other people present and failing to intervene.

Between Saturday, when a porn star calling herself Stoya accused Deen of rape, a third actress, Joanna Angel, described Deen in a Tweet as “literally the worst person I’ve ever met.”

Stoya had said in a Tweet that Deen raped her “while I said no, stop, used my safeword. I just can’t nod and smile when people bring him up anymore.”

After the accusations became public, the editor-in-chief of a web site called ‘The Frisky’ Tweeted, “There will be no future installments of James Deen’s sex advice column at The Frisky, for obvious reasons.”

Amelia McDonnell-Parry also said ads linking to Deen’s own web site would be removed, and she declared that she’d make a decision “within a few days” what to do about the presence on The Frisky of Deen’s earlier sex advice columns.

On Tuesday, Britain’s ‘The Independent‘ newspaper published a lengthy article on the growing scandal in which Deen is being compared to Bill Cosby, who’s been accused by a number of women of unwanted sex. The paper also said that “Project Consent, a grassroots campaign to combat sexual assault and rape culture, tweeted Sunday that it had removed an April interview with Deen from its website.”

It boggles the mind that one who ‘enjoys’ sex in the nature of his job would feel a need to seek unauthorized sex with women he works with — with whom, not to put too fine a point on it, he’s been ‘physically involved’ on the job.

Deen, like Cosby, had a ‘squeaky clean’ image before the allegations came one after another starting in October of 2014. Chances are good that both men’s reputations are ruined forever. ‘Couldn’t have happened to more deserving people!

 

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