Yellowstone Grizzly Bears Coming Off ‘Endangered Species’ List

grizleys

In what the U.S. Secretary of the Interior has called “one of America’s greatest conservation successes,” Yellowstone grizzly bears have so significantly increased in population in the past 40 years that, earlier this month, they wee removed from the “endangered species” list. All 700 or so of them – up from an estimated 135 in 1975 in the greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

The New York Times noted that, “The action will not affect the protected status of the other major population of grizzlies in the lower 48 states, those that live in and around Glacier National Park of Montana, which number about 1,000. However, experts say this population, too, could soon be delisted. Several small, isolated populations would remain protected.

Not everyone has favored so-favoring the Yellowstone grizzleys – not a specific subspecies of grizzleys, but so-named because they inhabit the area within and surrounding Yellowstone National Park in Montana.

Environmental groups intend to sue to stop the de-listing and local Native American tribes also object to the move. “Grizzly bears are the slowest reproducing mammal on the planet, and a population decline can take decades to reverse,” Endangered Species Coalition field representative Derek Goldman told Colin Dwyer at NPR. “Therefore we have been calling on Fish and Wildlife Service and the states to develop adequate management plans for grizzly bears before any de-listing is finalized.”

This is not the first time the move has been attempted. Under the Obama administration, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed de-listing the Yellowstone grizzly. But a massive batch of 650,000 public comments led to a delay in the decision, Karen Brulliard at The Washington Post, reported. The FWS also proposed the bear for de-listing in 2007 Robbins said, but that plan was halted by a court over concerns that insects were destroying white bark pine in the region, a major food source for the bears.

Chris Servheen, FWS’s former grizzly bear recovery coordinator who managed the program for 35 years, tells Brulliard the bears are resilient enough to survive de-listing and that they could still thrive under a well-managed hunting program. But he believes the population should stay about the size it is now to remain ecologically viable. But he adds, “a managed population decline post-delisting is not biologically defensible. We didn’t recover them to drive the population down.”