Don’t Eat This ANYWHERE: KFC-Scented Sunscreen

 

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This photo has NOTHING to do with this article — except insofar as the person depicted is clearly baffled by something — perhaps the idea of a KFC-branded sunscreen.

Who comes up with these ideas?

In order to trade on the popularity of one of its two styles of fried chicken, KFC USA, a subsidiary of Yum! Brands (Yum! ??) recently gave away 3,000 bottles of Extra Crispy Sunscreen – SPF 30 with a fried chicken scent. (Or, as CBS News put it, “fowl-smelling.”) Consumers snapped up the full production run within two hours of the product being announced on a KFC website, the company reported.

“We’ve had a lot of fun with our Extra Crispy Colonel campaign this summer, and the sunscreen idea seemed like a natural fit,” spokeswoman Kasey Mathes told USA Today.

The news site added that the campaign “dovetailed with KFC’s latest TV ad campaign featuring actor George Hamilton, noted for his deep, continuous suntan, as the Extra Crispy Colonel.”

Now, in that spirit, Mathes says, according to USA Today, “many fans around the country who claimed a bottle at a special web site can be living the ‘extra-crispy lifestyle’.”

Deli Market News reported that “KFC says more than 50 percent of Americans are oblivious to the difference and existence of two separate fried chicken recipes through the company – Original Recipe and Extra Crispy. Extra Crispy Chicken and Tenders are very crunchy and juicy, as well as cooked to a golden brown and hand-breaded,” the Deli news site said.

It promised to follow up, “as the public clucks out their answer,” to see if “chicken-smelling lotions be the next meat-induced craze to strike consumers.”

Given that The Associated Press has reported that samplers of the product around its henhouse failed to detect a chicken aroma from the product, that isn’t likely. Which, all things considered, is probably a blessing!

KFC stressed on its ‘extra-crispy’ web site that this sunscreen is NOT edible. The company hasn’t announced any plans to produce more of the product – no doubt a relief to the CBS presenter who declared the whole idea to be “offal”.